Atlantic Ocean caught storing heat for decades, creating global warming “staircase”

Warming Hiatus

Following rapid warming in the late 20th century, this century has so far seen surprisingly little increase in the average temperature at the Earth’s surface. At first this was a blip, then a trend, then a puzzle for the climate science community. New research co-authored by Ka-Kit Tung, a UW professor of applied mathematics and adjunct faculty member in atmospheric sciences, has found that the Atlantic Ocean has stored much of the missing heat, as part of a natural cycles.

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Cloud shapes, ocean microbes, Uruguayan agroforestry and more: this week's College-published research

Weekly Published Research

Each week we share the latest publications coming from the College of the Environment. Last week, twenty-three new articles co-authored by members of the College of the Environment were added to the Web of Science database, including research on glacial iron, landlocked sea lamprey, Typhoon Fanapi and more. (Unless otherwise noted, the articles link to abstracts only, as registration is required for full-text access.)

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UW program aims to diversify the conservation workforce

Joseph Eusebio

The Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program at UW wrapped up its inaugural year on August 14 in a symposium where students shared their experiences over the course of the summer. Focusing on the intersection of environment and society, the students spoke about the issues surrounding climate, water, biodiversity and food. Instead of learning about these topics solely in the classroom, a majority of their time was spent in the field around Washington state, including in our urban environments, along the coast, up in the mountains, and in the agricultural fields on the eastern side of the state. The experience was transformative for many, and helped the scholars think about the unique role they can play in conservation.

Read more at the Seattle Times »

Fishery sustainability, geogenomics, submarine volcano observatories and more: This week's College-published research

Weekly Published Research

Each week we share the latest publications coming from the College of the Environment. Last week, twenty new articles co-authored by members of the College of the Environment were added to the Web of Science database, including articles about transdisciplinary graduate education, integrated ecosystem assessments, management strategies for ocean acidification, and much more. Check them out!

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Ancient shellfish remains rewrite 10,000-year history of El Niño cycles

ancient clam shells

Scientists by their very nature are inquisitive and creative, often figuring out novel ways to answer complex and perplexing questions. In a paper recently released in Science, College of the Environment oceanographer Julian Sachs and colleagues use ancient clam shells to peer into the past and piece together a 10,000 year history of climate driven by the El Niño Southern Oscillation. Their findings challenge some common assumptions about the historical activity of El Niño, which has long been know to be a driver of climate worldwide.

Read more at UW Today »